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Periodical: The Journal of Borderland Research

Summary:  From Pat Deveney's database:

Journal of Borderland Research, The.
A factual and non-sectarian publication issued in the interests of Borderland Sciences Research Associates (BSRA) and of all students of psychic, occult, spiritistic and parapsychological phenomena / A Free-Thought Scientific Forum using the imagination and intuition to probe beyond the borders of human perceptions.
Other titles: Round Robin / Flying Roll / Borderlands, a Quarterly Journal of Borderland Research
1945—2004 Bimonthly; 7 (or 8 or 9) issues a year; quarterly; annually
San Diego, Vista, Bayside, Garberville, then Eureka, CA. Editor: Meade Layne, founder and director; Riley Hansard Crabb (1959-1985); Thomas J. Brown; Michael Theroux, managing editor; Vincent H. Gaddis, associate editor (of Round Robin).
Succeeds: Round Robin / Flying Roll (1945-1959) Succeeded by: Borderlands (1986-2004)
Corporate author: BSRA/F (Borderland Science Research Association / Foundation, Inc.)
1/1, February 1945-2004. 24-34 (originally mimeographed) pp. (varies), $6.00 a year, free with membership in BSRA/F.

This was the continuation of Meade Layne’s irregular, mimeographed Round Robin/Flying Roll, started at the end of World War II, and was the organ of his Borderland Sciences Research Associates, founded in 1951. Layne (1882-1961) was an academic philosopher and poet with a personal interest in the occult and spiritualism, and he sought to apply their open-boundaried methods to the study of the unexplained and mysterious that traditional science ignored. He had been a student of Frater Achad's and Israel Regardie's and in its early years the journal focused on Mark Probert, the "Telegnostic from San Diego," who was the trance medium for the group's communication with the Etherians and especially Yada D'Shiite, and on the work of Max Freedom Long, the proponent of the Hawaiian magic world of Huna. Over the passage of time, the journal turned more to the unexplained generally, "the Fortean falls of objects from the sky, Teleportation, Radiesthesia, PK effects, Underground Races, Mysterious Disappearances, Occult and Psychic Phenomena, Photography of the Invisible, Nature of the Ethers and the problem of the Aeroforms," etc., and to the likes of aurameters, thought-forms, the Drown Homo-Vibra Ray, Lakhovsky Wave Oscillators, Schauberger Water Technology, Hoerbiger's hollow earth, etheric physics, Atlantis, Eeman Screens, free energy, the Shaver Mystery, psychic surgery, aura goggles, Magnetic Vitality Research, and the like. The journal was one of the first to concentrate on UFOs (which it saw as "ether ships"). In its early days the journal had close ties, both in readership and contributors, with Ray Palmer's Amazing Stories. Occasional contributions by or excerpts from Manly P. Hall, David Patterson Hatch, Hereward Carrington, and others. Layne’s initial successor was Riley Crabb, an Hawaiian Theosophist and UFO lecturer and early proponent of the mystical use of LSD. LOC; Harvard University; California State University; Michigan State University; University of Illinois, Urbana, etc.

Issues:Round Robin V12 N5 Jan-feb 1957
Journal Of Borderland Research V20 N3 Apr-may 1964
Journal Of Borderland Research V20 N5 Jul-aug 1964
Journal Of Borderland Research V20 N6 Sep 1964
Journal Of Borderland Research V20 N7 Oct 1964
Journal Of Borderland Research V21 N1 Jan-feb 1965
Journal Of Borderland Research V21 N2 Mar 1965
Journal Of Borderland Research V21 N3 Apr-may 1965
Journal Of Borderland Research V21 N4 Jun 1965
Journal Of Borderland Research V21 N6 Sep 1965
Journal Of Borderland Research V21 N8 Nov-dec 1965
Journal Of Borderland Research V22 N1 Jan-feb 1966
Journal Of Borderland Research V22 N2 Mar 1966
Journal Of Borderland Research V22 N8 Nov-dec 1966
Journal Of Borderland Research V23 N3 May-jun 1967
Journal Of Borderland Research V23 N5 Sep-oct 1967
Journal Of Borderland Research V23 N7 Dec 1967
Journal Of Borderland Research V24 N1 Jan-feb 1968
Journal Of Borderland Research V24 N3 May-jun 1968
Journal Of Borderland Research V24 N5 Sep-oct 1968
Journal Of Borderland Research V26 N2 Mar-apr 1970
Journal Of Borderland Research V27 N6 Nov-dec 1971
Journal Of Borderland Research V28 N2 Mar-apr 1972
Journal Of Borderland Research V28 N6 Nov-dec 1971
Journal Of Borderland Research V29 N2 Mar-apr 1973
Journal Of Borderland Research V44 N4 Jul-aug 1988
Journal Of Borderland Research V45 N3 may-jun 1989
Journal Of Borderland Research V45 N4 Jul-aug 1989
Journal Of Borderland Research V45 N5 Sep-oct 1989
Journal Of Borderland Research V45 N6 Nov-dec 1989
Journal Of Borderland Research V46 N2 Mar-apr 1990
Journal Of Borderland Research V47 N2 Mar-apr 1991
Journal Of Borderland Research V47 N4 Jul-aug 1991
Journal Of Borderland Research V47 N5 Sep-oct 1991
Journal Of Borderland Research V48 N1 Jan-feb 1992
Journal Of Borderland Research V48 N4 Jul-aug 1992
Journal Of Borderland Research V48 N6 Nov-dec 1992
Borderlands V49 Q1 1993
Borderlands V49 Q2 1993
Borderlands V49 Q4 1993
Borderlands V50 Q2 1994
Borderlands V50 Q3 1994
Borderlands V50 Q4 1994
Journal Of Borderland Research V58 2004

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